FTDI FT2232 MPSSE Basics

FTDI FT2232 MPSSE Basics

I started a project working on interfacing with the Future Technology Devices International Ltd. (FTDI) USB FT2232H Mini Module via their D2XX device driver.  This device hooks up to a computer through a standard USB port and has a series of pins that can be used to interface with JTAG, I2C, and whatever serial like protocol you want.  I had been using the Application Note AN_135 FTDI MPSSE Basics provided by the manufacturer and noticed that their Example Program (Chapter 5), which is very good, was not available for download, but only printed in pieces in their Application Note.  As I went through the Application Note, I was writing out the example along with their comments and had a few minor corrections to get it working in a Linux environment.

I am making my transcription of the Example Program and corrections available on GitHub below.

Accessing Mentor FlexLM License Server via SSH Port Forwarding

Accessing Mentor FlexLM License Server via SSH Port Forwarding

Your FlexLM License server might be behind a firewall that makes it unaccessible even if you are VPNed into that network.  The FlexLM server could be only listening to machines on a certain subnet of addresses or have some other reason to communicate with only certain machines.  That firewall makes things like my post Installing Mentor Questa on Ubuntu much more difficult to complete if you wanted to run something like Mentor Questa on your remote machine.

This is my recipe that will allow you to do the necessary ssh forwarding to be able to communicate with a FlexLM server as if you were at a machine on its native network.

Installing Mentor Questa on Ubuntu

Installing Mentor Questa on Ubuntu

I use Mentor Questa a lot and when I am at work the visual lag of interacting with the GUI is almost imperceptible.  But, when I am working remotely that visual lag is, of course, more noticeable. One possible solution that reduces the lag considerably compared to VNC, NX, or Windows Remote Desktop is to run Questa natively on your local computer.

The first problem you will run into is that Questa is only officially supported on Redhat and SUSE Linux.  (It is also supported on Microsoft Windows too, but who really does serious engineering work on Windows?)  So, if Questa is only supported on two commercial Linux variants are we stuck on installing Redhat at home from the corporate install?  Fortunately, no.

You can install Mentor Questa on Ubuntu Linux.  I'll go through installing it on Ubuntu 12.04.3 64bit.

Using Emacs to Debug Verilog Compiles in Mentor Questa

Using Emacs to Debug Verilog Compiles in Mentor Questa

I hadn't used Emacs to compile and parse errors for Mentor Questa before and decided to see what that would be like.  Making Emacs understand how the simulator works and spits out errors involves extending Emacs to know how to launch your Verilog simulator and how to interpret the console messages.  The built in Emacs compilation mode is not terrible and at least gives a starting point for compiling and debugging standard languages and custom ones. This is how to do it with Mentor Questa.

Merging SystemVerilog Covergroups for Efficiency

Merging SystemVerilog Covergroups for Efficiency

In the previous blog post, we were merging covergroups and, in all cases, keeping track of the covergroup instances "INST" (the Mentor Questa notation) data as well.  This is perfectly fine if you have only a few repeated instances. But, what if you have thousands of instances in your design - the covergroup data can get bloated.